Artemis: Literary Sources

Artemis: Literary Sources searches across multiple literary databases offered by the publisher Gale such as the Literature Resource Center and MLA International Bibliography. In addition to basic and advanced searching capabilities, Artemis features visualizations of the frequency with which terms appear. The Term Frequency and Term Clustering visualizations are a simple form of text mining to detect patterns and relationships in the database.

Artemis Literary

Search  Besides full-text search of documents, it is also possible to do a “Person Search” for authors, using the Advanced Search feature, by creating a customized profile with options that include gender, nationality, ethnicity, occupation, literary movement, genre, subject/theme, place of birth or death, date of birth or death, and century. Person Search returns a list of writers who match the search criteria. The “Works Search” feature of Advanced Search finds works that match a customized profile that the user creates using one or more of these categories: type of work (e.g. essay, play, graphic novel), author, publication year, century, original language, gender, nationality and ethnicity.

Eileen Clancy’s blog post has tips for search in Artemis: Literary Sources and understanding the limitations of the Term Frequency and Term Clustering visualization tools.

Jolanda-Pieta van Arnhem, a reviewer for the Charleston Advisor, gave the user interface and searchability functions in Artemis five stars.

Translations and audio

Special features of Artemis: Literary Sources include translations of documents into many languages and audio recordings of documents that can be downloaded as MP3 files.

Contents

The particular configuration of Artemis: Literary Sources that one has access to depends upon the multiple modules that the library has purchased. Modules may include: Literature Criticism Online; Literature Resources; LitFinder; Scribner Writers Online; Twayne’s Authors Online, MLA International Bibliography and Gale Virtual Reference Library.

Date range: 2500 BCE to present

Publisher: Gale Cengage

Publisher About page: http://gdc.gale.com/gale-artemis/literary-sources

Object type: Books, Journals, Indexes

Location of original materials: Multiple

Exportable image: Yes

Facsimile image: Yes

Full text searchable: Yes

Titles list links: See listings for each module.

Original catalog: Multiple

Digitized from microfilm: No

Original sources: Multiple

Jolanda-Pieta van Arnhem, a reviewer for the Charleston Advisor, gave the user interface and searchability functions in Artemis five stars.

Arnhem, Jolanda-Pieta van. Artemis: Literary Sources. The Charleston Advisor 15.3 (2014): 5–9. Paywalled article.

Click on WorldCat to see the library closest to you that has access to this database.

In the U.S., Gale offers telephone support at 1-800-877-4253, option 4.

Tutorials from the publisher

Video

Basics (3:26)
Creating a Gale Virtual Reference Library eBook Subcollection for Artemis Literary Sources (5:48)
Searching (8:25)
Using Term Frequency & Term Clusters (2:20)
Working with Documents (2:57)

Webinar (one-hour)

Eileen Clancy’s blog post has tips for search in Artemis: Literary Sources and understanding the limitations of the Term Frequency and Term Clustering visualization tools.

MLA style

To cite online and electronic works, MLA style, see the guides at Research and Documentation Online, 5th edition, Diana Hacker.

Citing the digital

While digital resources are ubiquitous, comparatively few scholars cite them, preferring instead to cite the print version. Yet if digital sources are not cited, it is impossible for archives, university libraries, funders and other entities to know whether the collections are useful and should be expanded, or to make evidence-based arguments for future digitization of other materials. Jonathan Blaney of the Humanities Research Institute offers an egregious example of this, saying that 31 million page views of British History Online over a two-year period resulted in only 89 citations in Google Scholar and Scopus combined. Blaney asks scholars to embrace the principle—cite what you used.

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